Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

HIST 420. Indiana Normal School during World War One. Introduction to Public History. Spring 2016: Spanish Influenza in Indiana County

Influenza at the Normal School

Resources Consulted

“Eight New Cases Of ‘Flu’ In Indiana.” Indiana Evening Gazette. October 25, 1918.   This article reports that eight new cases of the flu were reported to the Indiana Board of Health, which is taken as a sign that health conditions in the county are not improving. It also reports that there were eight cases of illness at the Indiana Normal School at this time, only some of which were the flu. The flu in mining towns is also mentioned. The article also mention the use of a flu "serum" in Pittsburgh.

“Enforcement in the County.” Indiana Evening Gazette. October 4, 1918.  This article reports that all public amusement places in Indiana have been closed, as per the state’s orders. It states that it is up to the local board of health to decide if schools should be closed. The article also says that there are 15 reported cases of the flu in Indiana.

“Epidemic Costs 1,900,000 Shells.” Indiana Evening Gazette. October 25, 1918.  This article claims that the flu has cost the Army 1,900,000 shells. Since the coal mining industry contributes to the creation of shells and the flu struck coal mining towns particularly hard, they have not contributed as much as they were expected to.

“Epidemic Disease Causes Six Deaths; Conditions Good Here.” Indiana Evening Gazette. 12, 1918.  This article reports that while more cases are reported in mining towns and their health conditions are not improving, the town of Indiana seems to have good health conditions with no new cases reported in the past 24 hours. It also reports that parents and students are pleased with the restrictions and quarantines put in place at the Indiana State Normal School. The article also discusses ways to stay healthy like wearing gauze masks and getting plenty of bed rest.

“Epidemic Progresses No More Deaths But Many New Cases Developing.” Indiana Evening Gazette. October 2, 1918. This article reports on the situation in the coal towns and says that 60 new cases of the flu were reported in the past 24 hours. It also says that the state has sent two nurses to help. The article offers precautions to take so you don’t catch the flu.

“Health Board Takes Action.” Indiana Evening Gazette. October 11, 1918.  ◦This article reports that conditions are improving at the Indiana State Normal School. Those who have the flu seem to be improving and there have been no new cases reported.

“Influenza Claimed Twenty-One Victims Since Last Saturday.” Indiana Evening Gazette. October 14, 1918. ◦This article reports that 21 people in Indiana County have died from the flu while others are still sick. It also discusses the effect the flu is having on mining towns and the local undertakers.

“Influenza Claims Four Victims.” Indiana Evening Gazette. October 11, 1918. This article reports on the situation in the mining towns and says that although the situation is bad there is hope for improvement soon.

Leathers, Dorie. “Surviving the Spainish Flu in 1918.” Clark House News. January 2006.  This is an article that was published in the Indiana County Historical Society newsletter. It details the effects of the flu throughout Indiana County.

Oliver, James M. “Danger Flu!” Indiana County Heritage 6, no. 2 (Winter 1978–Winter 1979): 25–32.  This article details the influenza epidemic in Indiana County. It covers things like amount of people effected, the effect on businesses, and thoughts as to why the flu was able to become an epidemic.

“Quarantine Lifted From The Normal.” Indiana Evening Gazette. October 14, 1918. This article reports that the quarantine on Indiana Normal School was lifted in October 14, 1918.

Scrapbook dating from 1918-1919. Record Group 53 Box 38. Special Collections and Archives, Stapleton Library, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, Pennsylvania. This is scrapbook that was made by a student at Indiana Normal School during 1918-1919. It features an influenza quarantine sign which is pictured above.

“State Takes Drastic Action.” Indiana Evening Gazette. October 4, 1918.  This article reports that all “public amusement places” like theatres and pool rooms have been closed throughout Pennsylvania in an effort to keep the flu from spreading.

Stephenson, Clarence D. Indiana County 175th Anniversary History. Vol. 2. 5 vols. Indiana, PA: The A.G. Halldin Publishing Company, Inc., 1989.  This is a history of Indiana County. There is a section about the Spanish influenza epidemic in the county that gives basic information like how many people were effected, what cities were effected, and what kinds of businesses were effected.

“Tent Hospital Is In Prospect.” Indiana Evening Gazette. October 4, 1918. This article reports on the flu in mining towns, noting that a local doctor contracted the disease. It also says that the state has sent in seven nurses and two doctors to help with the situation.

“Uncle Sam’s Advice on Flu.” Indiana Evening Gazette. October 9, 1918. This article is a re-print of an interview with the Surgeon General. It discusses things like what the flu is, what causes it, and what someone should do if they catch it.

 

Spanish Influenza in Indiana County Work Group

Alicia Britton

Cheyenne Rager

Joe Hildebrand